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We Will Be Remembered by What We Did. So, What Can We Do?

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Brand Solidarity shares tangible ways for both businesses and individuals to support the people of Ukraine

We Will Be Remembered by What We Did. So, What Can We Do?


At a packed event held by Brand Solidarity, hard-hitting techniques for brands and individuals to use in support of Ukraine were offered by a panel of branding, PR, and social media experts. The key messages were: move fast because you’ll be remembered for dithering, be united to have an impact, and be authentic – don’t turn your action into a brand message – Brand Solidarity is about ‘them’ not ‘you’. See below for the list of Brand Solidarity tips for supporting Ukraine. 

Brand Solidarity is a movement mobilising brands throughout the world to demonstrate their support for Ukraine; by featuring the Brand Solidarity logo on as much marketing material as possible, a relentless visual display of global solidarity can be created. By doing this, people throughout the world, including Russian citizens, politicians and oligarchs, will receive the loud and clear message that the world is with Ukraine and wants peace. 

Marcel Knobil, founder of Brand Solidarity, hosted the panel of experts (at Brand Finance’s Global Soft Power Summit) consisting of: Sophie Devonshire, CEO, The Marketing Society, Felix Henderson, co-founder, The Look After Group, Neville Hobson, social strategist, writer and podcaster and Marina Pesenti, a member of the Ukrainian Institute’s Supervisory Board. On a practical level, Marina said, the most urgent need was for investment in equipment protecting the numerous citizens supporting the soldiers – many don’t even have helmets. She went on to say how the action many UK businesses has taken is overwhelming but she hopes that the support won’t wane as time goes on. Marcel agreed: “Brands and individuals must do all they can to keep this crisis on the front page – this war is not just fought on the battlefield but on social media, newspapers, and TV too.” 

Social media has become key to communicating the truth and, said Henderson, we must continue to engage with young people, and give them the facts, as they have enormous power to spread the message. This is especially pertinent in light of YouGov’s latest research revealing that whilst three in five Britons say that they are less likely to buy from a brand doing business in Russia, this rises to two-thirds of those aged 50-65+, but falls to just one-third of those aged 18-24. 

Hobson commended businesses and people to push their industry bodies to unite and amplify the message of support. Approaching 100 brands, plus associations including the Institute of Directors, Essex Chambers of Commerce, and The Marketing Society, have united under the Brand Solidarity banner. Devonshire said whether a brand or individual, you are what you do, not what you say, and  paraphrased Jeff Bezos: “this is all about deeds, not words.” 

Attendees including various industry leaders and Vanessa Feltz, TV and radio presenter and journalist, as well as Leanne Benjamin former principal of The Royal Ballet, participated in the discussion. 

The brand solidarity logo can be used by any brand (or individual) wishing to display support for Ukraine; email marcel@brandguru.org your logo and you’ll receive the Brand Solidarity logo with guidelines for use. For more information about Brand Solidarity, please visit: BrandSolidarity.org
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Brand Solidarity’s Tips for Supporting Ukraine 



Action Businesses Can Take: 


1. Ensure that you and your colleagues are well informed about the situation in Ukraine.

2. Be authentic. The message is all about the wellbeing of Ukraine - not about your brand (but the tone and values should complement your own). 

3. Get together with your trade or industry association to show a united front of support.

4. Be creative in finding ways to engage your audiences, including your colleagues.

5. Encourage the MD or chief executive to write to the local MP.

6. Use the brand solidarity logo (and #BrandSolidarityUkraine) on as much marketing material as possible to create a strong and persistent visual display of support. 

7. Helping Ukraine is about deeds, not words so, whatever you do, do it fast and do it with purpose; hesitancy is not a good look. 

8. Make sure the Russian flag is not visible in your building or on your website.

9. Support companies that have stopped trading with Russia and don’t do business with Russia.

10. Donate in kind: you may produce or sell goods that would be much appreciated by aid charities; the company may also have relevant expertise needed by charities.

11. Use your communication platforms to convey the correct facts about the invasion; not everyone is as in-touch as you’d like to think. If you can translate copy into Russian too, even better. 

12. Don’t share any messages until you’ve read them; you could be helping to spread misinformation. Check the veracity of them

13. Donate: there are numerous good causes to choose from including the Disasters Emergency Committee. Nova Poshta is delivering aid to Ukraine for free. You can post or take parcels directly to their warehouses in Maidstone and Eastleigh, or donate to support their efforts. And there are many more in addition to those that are providing protective equipment to civilians supporting soldiers on the front line.  

14. Support Ukrainian businesses. Do business with them, offer resources, offer expertise, etc.

15. Don’t stop, keep the pressure on until communications, sanctions and action make a real difference. 



Action Anyone Can Take: 


1. Be authentic. The message is all about the wellbeing of Ukraine - not about you (but the tone and values should complement your own), 

2. If a member of a union or trade association, encourage it to show a united front of support.

3. Be inventive and creative in the way you communicate. Existing messages will appear fresh if they are creatively reinvigorated. 

4. Write to your local MP. 

5. Use the brand solidarity logo (and #BrandSolidarityUkraine) on social media, emails, etc.

6. Book Airbnbs in Ukraine. This is a practical way of funnelling money to Ukrainians.

7. Use social media to counteract Russian misinformation, conveying the correct facts about the invasion - not everyone is as in-touch as you’d like to think. If you can get your text translated into Russian too, even better. And chat with friends and colleagues. 

8. Go to Google Maps, then go to Russia, find a restaurant or business and write a review explaining what’s really happening in Ukraine. If you can get your text translated into Russian too, even better. 

9. Stay on top of information. (Reuters, BBC, etc, and the New Voice of Ukraine cover breaking news and produce regular updates). 

10. Create your own awareness and fundraising initiatives.

11. Don’t buy Russian products or services. 

12. Donate. There are numerous good causes to choose from including the Disasters Emergency Committee. Nova Poshta is delivering aid to Ukraine for free. You can post or take parcels directly to their warehouses in Maidstone and Eastleigh, or donate to support their efforts. And there are many more in addition to those that are providing protective equipment to civilians supporting soldiers on the front line.

13. Donate your expertise to Ukrainian organisations and relevant charities. 

14. Attend, or even arrange, solidarity rallies. 

15. Don’t stop, keep the pressure on until communications, sanctions and action make a real difference. 


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LBB Editorial, Mon, 21 Mar 2022 14:41:00 GMT