Peach
Hobby home page
liahome
Soundlounge
Electriclime gif
jw collective
Contemplative Reptile
Editions
  • International Edition
  • USA Edition
  • UK Edition
  • Australian Edition
  • Canadian Edition
  • Irish Edition
  • German Edition
  • Singapore Edition
  • Spanish edition
  • Polish edition
  • Indian Edition
  • Middle East edition
  • South Africa Edition

The Fight Against Digital Darwinism

Awards and Events 0 Add to collection

Mad men and editors discuss at Advertising Week Europe

The Fight Against Digital Darwinism

 

Advertising Week Europe drew to a glorious conclusion today with a delectable programme of insight and debate, driving the future of the industry. 
 
Highlights of the day included:
 
EVENING STANDARD EDITOR SARAH SANDS AND EDITOR OF THE SUN’S BIZARRE GORDON SMART ON PRESS REGULATION
 
A wide ranging discussion between Evening Standard editor Sarah Sands, The Sun’s Bizarre editor Gordon Smart and legendary television producer John Lloyd touched on the integration of advertising and editorial, the ongoing importance of print media, and particularly of the impact of Leveson.
 
Sarah Sands said: “It is difficult to be a journalist without a romantic attachment to an unlicensed press.”
 
Gordon Smart described newspapers as “going through a Harold Shipman moment… because of terrible, disgusting things that happened at News of the World. We were all horrified by that.”   
 
POWER TO THE PEOPLE! AD LAND LEARNING TO COPE WITH CONSUMER POWER
 
Talks at today’s Advertising Week Europe spoke of brand assassins (frightening everyone from Number 10 to boutique firms), digital Darwinism, and the fight to stay ahead of the curve in an ecosystem where a single tweet can destroy the reputation of an entire company. Key statistics came from Karl-Heinz Land, who pointed out that 75% of internet content generated is created by individuals, and referred to strategist Brian Solis who anticipates that 70% of all Fortune 1000 companies will be replaced as a result of digital disruption.
 
INTERNET’S NOT KILLED THE TV STAR
 
Although television advertising revenues have plummeted 55% since the turn of the last millennium according to Nick Bampton, Director of Commercial Sales at Channel 5, television will still remain relevant as marketeers recalibrate to adjust with cross-platform viewing.
 
The first advert to be broadcast in the US was in 1942, followed 13 years later by the UK in 1955.
 
view more - Awards and Events
Sign up to our newsletters and stay up to date with the best work and breaking ad news from around the world.
lbbonline.com, Fri, 22 Mar 2013 10:25:50 GMT