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Meet TAKUMI's Female Collective Creator: Foxanne

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TAKUMI sits down with artists and illustrator Roxanne Plastow on her partnership with TAKUMI Female Collective

Meet TAKUMI's Female Collective Creator: Foxanne

Artist, Illustrator and Feminist, Roxanne Plastow (Foxanne) has been making waves in the UK for her quirky slogan prints and promoting a specific kind of sex-positive, female-empowerment, Gen-Z feminism, that encourages women to put themselves first.

Foxanne is part of TAKUMI Female Collective, an Insight Collective sub-group of TAKUMI X. TAKUMI X is the new creative division within TAKUMI taking a creator-led approach to influencer marketing, enabling brands to work closer than ever before with creators to produce innovative and culturally relevant content.

The TAKUMI Female Collective will help shape brand narratives that represent a highly credible female creator’s own experiences in culture. It will tackle challenges that marketers face while highlighting what is most important to women today.

Takumi sat down with Foxanne to discuss why she has chosen to partner with the TAKUMI Female Collective, and why she is FED-UP with period brands using *that* ‘mysterious blue liquid’.


Q> You have thousands of fans who you inspire with your art and content on social media every day. Was there someone or something that inspired you to become such a champion of equality and female empowerment?

Roxanne> It’s not until I got older I reflected on my teen self and realised how much-internalised misogyny I dealt with daily, and how consent and boundaries are taught so backwards, I was always told by adults ‘boys will be boys’ what does that even mean? Due to this, I had weird and misconstrued visions of what my boundaries were and how to please people. Its due to this self-reflection (which sucks, it’s a hard process to be so self-critical of yourself), I started researching sex, gender, and equality via my art.

Progressively over the last six years, I’ve seen first-hand how dangerous the world can be especially as a womxn, most of us can’t even walk down the street without catcalls, unwanted sexual aggression, or assault. I strongly believe revolution starts from within, for example, the more I’ve been drilling these positive affirmations into my brain and so much empowerment, I’ve realised my worth. The worth I’ve had all along, which in the past has been taken away from me, without my consent. I know I’m worthy of great things, I know I might come across as ‘loud’ or ‘in your face’, but that’s passion, and also, I’m only called those things because I’m a womxn who knows her voice and isn’t afraid of using it. So, if my art helps just one person, it is worth it.


Q> What does feminism mean to you?

Roxanne> Feminism isn’t an insult. Feminism isn’t a word that takes something away from men; it’s a word that encompasses the fact that we are in need of equality, across the board. Fighting for equality for every gender, sexual orientation, race, socioeconomic status, and ability. I am a feminist because I’m tired of saying sorry and feeling guilty because of nothing more than being a womxn. I’m tired of apologising because I’ve got angry or constantly being talked over, I’m tired of feeling the need to wear slouchy clothes, so a random person on the street doesn’t think it’s an invitation to touch me, I’m tired of being tired.


Q> Why have you decided to partner with TAKUMI Female Collective, and why are you excited about this opportunity?

Roxanne> I’m super honoured to be included in this amazing group of womxn and help with the promotion of products for the next generations to come.

I want no more ‘mysterious blue liquids’ on period product ads, I mean, what in the alien horror show is that about? It might seem like a small problem to tackle, but I think this played a role in how embarrassed I was when I was at school, and when I was on my period, all the adverts were blue and what was in my pad was definitely not blue. It was blood, and scary, I mean BLOOD! I feel if I were watching sanitary product ads and seeing the red liquid rather than the blue, by the time I was on my period, I would have desensitised myself to the colour that greeted me in my knickers every 28 days. (also, 28 days? Lol I wish, I used to wish for regular periods before I went to sleep, at least then I knew to expect it. Rather than jumping in PE and feeling like, I’ve wet myself). I’m excited to learn from these other womxn because I don’t know everything, I’m still learning, and I’m excited not only to share my knowledge on things but to learn from others too.


Q> One of the biggest challenges’ brands face is connecting women with their products and services in a meaningful way. How do you think brands can do more to engage with their female consumers?

Roxanne> I find everything is aimed towards the idea of what a middle-aged, middle-class womxn would like, or a teenage girl who has lots of friends; there’s no in-between.

It seems when things are aimed towards women, it’s aimed at an outdated version of what women want. Again, with the period ads, who wears white pants when they are on their period?

Serious question, One. I don’t know many people who wear white pants… full stop. Two especially not when it’s the time of the month. Why is wearing white pants whilst on a bike on your period the one thing they advertise? I want to know how absorbent it is, so it doesn’t ruin my knickers or doesn’t leak out whilst I’m sat on the bus, or I’m able to sneeze without having to clean up two messes. We have come a long way from sexist adverts, but I feel there’s still a long way to go!


Q> What’s most important to you when pursuing brand partnerships?

Roxanne> It’s important that brands practice what they preach, for example, if a company is all about female empowerment, and the top 20 people in the company are all white men, it doesn’t add up, it feels insincere and just a buzzword used to gain profits. If a brand’s mission is all about eco and sustainability and all of their products are disposable, and packing is recyclable, but the workers aren’t on a fair wage, it doesn’t add up. All the fundamentals need to follow the pattern to the top too!

I like to make sure brands I work with follow the same morals as I do too; this will not only make our partnership more authentic. But if I am invested in a business, I am 100% behind the business mission; I will do everything in my power to help that business THRIVE!


Q> What can we expect next from you?

Roxanne> I love setting goals! My five-year plan is to get a book deal, if any publishing houses are reading this, holla! I want a book that is beautifully illustrated by yours truly, and is full of female empowerment, activities, tips, and tricks! I plan to grow both sides of my business enough, so I can employ a variety of people and have the best team!

The TAKUMI Female Collective aims to bring brands and creators closer together to create content that fully captures all the different elements of femininity and allows brands to make their messaging relevant to their female audience.


Check out some of more of Foxanne’s illustrations here and here


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Takumi, Wed, 04 Nov 2020 10:32:20 GMT