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Fresh Cuts: 16 Up and Coming Editors You Need to Know

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Get to know the industry’s most exciting editing prospects

Fresh Cuts: 16 Up and Coming Editors You Need to Know


Editing is a highly valued skill in the realm of post production - an ever developing world with new technologies, mediums and demands appearing all the time - and is one that takes a long and intense journey of training as an assistant before you earn the role of ‘editor’. Once all the creative and filming is finished, that is merely the start of an editor’s journey - where, more and more, they’re having to compose stories and develop narratives for an increasing number of formats, aspect ratios and time durations - not to mention the rising need for editors to be well-versed in all aspects of post-production, from sound design to VFX. To showcase some rising talents, LBB’s Ben Conway spoke with 16 people from edit houses across the world who have recently been promoted from assistant to editor.    


Kevin Corry

The Assembly Rooms



What do you love about editing?

It's all about storytelling for me. I come from a background and culture of storytelling so it's always been something I've been around and fascinated by. With editing you are essentially doing the final rewrite of the story and I find it so exciting to be the one to pull it all together. 


What project are you proudest of and why?

I cut a short documentary last year for Vogue’s pride campaign, it was a mountain of work to get through to get it over the line in time. Everyone really pitched in on it all the way along and worked so hard. I was given a lot of scope on the project to inject my own creative flare into the edit. The whole project was so inspiring and challenging. When it was all over it was an amazing feeling to stand back and be proud of what we accomplished.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

I feel like technology is slimming down the time needed between shoot and starting the edit. You are seeing more and more editors actually working on set as films are being shot, it's a new way of working and I think this is going to lead to some great work. New formats can be challenging to figure out how to tell the story in a new way that will work given the restraints but this can be a good thing as it forces you to hone in on what is truly crucial in the story you are trying to tell. 


What are your editing ambitions?

I want to edit pieces that have something to say, and can positively affect change in the world that we live in. I'd love to cut a feature length documentary in the coming years and for the moment I just want to work on projects that have a message or that allow me to express my creativity in the edit.



Nadia Cordeiro

Gramercy Park Studios



What do you love about editing?

It has always been about story telling through imagery for me. I started taking portrait photographs when I was about 11 years old. But the film that got me into moving picture was ‘Le Fabuleux Destin d'Amélie Poulain’. I can’t quite pin point today what it was, but there was something about the beautiful imagery and the pace of the film, that just grabbed me and made me curious about moving picture. A few years later I had to do a documentary for a school project, and still remember the excitement of editing it, and seeing the project come to life. It was the post production, the sitting down in front of a computer and putting the story together, that really excited me.


What project are you proudest of and why?

There are a couple of jobs that I’m proud off, some because of the limited time frame we had for delivery, others for the fact there were so many issues with the footage and I still managed to make something nice out of it. But the one I’m most proud of is the Zalando Free To Be – Breast Cancer Awareness campaign. It was about these amazing people who went through (or where still going through) the battles of breast cancer, and use fashion to regain the control of how they look, and feel about a body that has failed them. It’s not the most flashy edit, but it was a privilege to listen to all those interviews, and be able to show this people looking strong, powerful and confident, during/after a tremendous hard time.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

Not only the technology is constantly evolving, but also the way people consume video has changed a lot over the years. I’ve also noticed there’s an increased need for multifaceted editors. Knowing different software that you wouldn’t necessarily need to know a few years ago, is now a major plus. As an editor you need to constantly learn new creative ways to meet new needs, and make your content interesting to the viewer. We need to be more versatile, quicker,  supply faster, whilst still creating hight quality content.


What are your editing ambitions?

I want to work with more creative directors and emerging directors, to help bring their creative ideas to life. I am currently working on a documentary style short film about the photographer Charlie Phillips which is in the final stages of post.  I’ve also just finished some content for San Pellegrino with the legendary Stanley Tucci! I would really like to do more work like this as well as short form content. That is where I want to continue developing my creative skills.



Alex Heisterkamp 

Camp Lucky



What do you love about editing?

Editing speaks to my core components. I’m a bit obsessive, I’m a bit calculated and a bit instinctive, and I’m always just a bit chilly - which is perfect because I can sit in a chair with my jacket on all day. I love the adrenaline rush you get the first time you hit play for creatives. Days worth of work and build up for the next thirty seconds. Does it suck? Is it genius? Will they or won’t they? This is my version of skydiving. And most importantly, I love to daydream - which I think is crucial for a creative mind. But it’s a bit of a lost art-form in our society.


What project are you proudest of and why?

When I was an assistant, I was helping on a series of Toyota spots. One night, I stayed late, took a bunch of b-roll scraps the editor wasn’t using, wrote a line of copy, grabbed the most epic song I’d ever heard of (Outro by M83 - I know, I’m deep), and cut together my own :30. The next day, I showed it to my editor, who forced me to show it to the agency. So I sat down in the suite, turned the volume up to eleven, and hit play. The hair on my arms stood on end. They loved it. They loved it so much, they presented it to Toyota and turned it into a deliverable. The agency wrote a new line of copy, took it from a :30 to a :15, and of course we have to find stock music to replace M83. But I didn’t care. I got a spot that I created out of thin air. That was special. And it taught me that my goal as an editor isn’t just to make commercials, it’s to enliven the creatives and producers that are sitting in the edit suite with me. I need to get them excited about the work. 


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

It seems like ads have never been in higher demand than they are now. Our deliverables list seems to grow every year. The shelf life of ads is decreasing, which means more content. I think this has opened up brands to take more risks, be more creative, and have more fun. It’s fun to be faced with the challenge of, ‘how do I make this edit work as 16x9 and a 4x5?’.


What are your editing ambitions?

Edit a film trailer. Like a big-ish one. I’ve cut a few fan-made trailers where I took a movie and switched up the genre, and I loved it. I figure with the amount of content these days, there’s a decent chance I can do it in the next ten years.




Alex’s showreel can be found here.



Zoe Desgraupes

Flock Edit



What do you love about editing?

Somewhere between folders of raw material and the final version, there is this moment where I suddenly see where it’s going, when the edit starts taking shape. Part of the fun in the creative process is anticipating what it's going to turn into.


What project are you proudest of and why?

It’s always tricky to pick a favourite, but the pieces I usually feel most proud of are the longer ones, especially the documentaries. I like to be part of projects on topics that matter to me. Last year, I edited a mini-series on climate change that was a lot of fun to work on, despite the somewhat depressing topic. I’ve also really enjoyed working on a collaboration between Vuse and McLaren, giving a platform to female artists.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

Schedules are getting shorter and shorter but craft still takes time. I think it’s important to keep that space for creativity, even when budgets and production are trying to push for a quicker turnaround. There are constantly new platforms for video and it can be an exciting challenge to adapt to those and see how else you can tell a story. 


What are your editing ambitions?

Documentary is something I’d like to do more of. I’d like to be part of projects that inspire me and have the potential to inspire others too. Collaborating with directors or other editors on projects can really turn an edit completely so it’s something I look for - someone in the room says something and you just see the edit in a different light. I love when that happens.




Zoey Peck

Ethos Studio



What do you love about editing?

I love the initial planning stage. In the moments right before I start cutting anything, there’s a lot of wheels turning. I’m thinking of all the different ways it could go, and in what ways I can surprise the viewer. I love all the experimentation that happens leading up to the first cut. That's my favorite part. 


What project are you proudest of and Why?

The project I am most proud of is a thirty-second spot I did for W Magazine featuring the brand Loewe, and comedian/writer Ziwe. That one is where I found the perfect balance of weird and good, and it’s where I found my voice. 


How is the role of the editor changing? 

Ever since I started, it's been very social media-oriented. Editors have a unique advantage that allows us to get crazy with the edits because most of the content being made today is not for a TV audience. There's more room for experimentation and risk-taking. It used to be that if you didn't notice the editing, the editor did a good job. Now I kind of think it's the opposite. The role of the editor is to be more aware of making the editing apparent. Like the equivalent to breaking the fourth wall. 


What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

Having to re-frame everything to be 9x16 or 1x1 can present some challenges, and sometimes take away from the original intention of a given shot. But anything that’s a challenge can also be an opportunity for creativity. 


What are your editing ambitions?

I have so many! I’d love to cut a music video for an artist I really admire and look up to. Making music videos as a kid is what got me into editing in the first place. If I got to cut a video for one of my favourite artists, it would be a dream come true and a full-circle moment! I would also love to cut a docu-series one day. Docs are where editors really shine. It’s probably the most challenging thing an editor can do. And with my background primarily being music videos and ads, I think I could add a lot of pizzazz to a doc!



Zoey’s showreel can be found here.



Dillon Stoneburner

Final Cut



What do you love about editing?

I love putting together the puzzle. You have hours and hours of footage and being able to turn all of that footage into a story is pretty amazing. Especially when that story is important and impactful. Almost anyone can edit together some driving footage, but being able to tell a story through editing is a very unique and important quality.

 

What project are you proudest of and why?

I'm still relatively early in my career and still very much building a body of work, so many of my projects represent a milestone of some kind. That being said, I was able to work on a couple of projects over the course of the pandemic that focused on creating change and generating resources for people in need. Those are the kind of projects that I am proud of and passionate about.

 

How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

I’m not really sure - obviously, we have to be able to adapt to these new changes but I think the most important thing is to define boundaries before working on a new project, in order to keep a solid work/life balance and not burn out.


What are your editing ambitions?

To tell meaningful stories, in whatever world that may be. Working on features and feature-length documentaries that send important messages about race/gender/equality/mental health, and help to create change.




Lily Davies

the Editors



What do you love about editing? 

Without question, the storytelling. I find it endlessly fascinating looking at the myriad of ways a scene can be cut to convey different emotion and narrative. 


What project are you proudest of and why?

Co-editing the feature documentary Wash My Soul In The River’s Flow (alongside editor Matias Bolla) was a career highlight. The film explores the lives of two of Australia’s most talented artists: Archie Roach and Ruby Hunter. It was a true privilege to tell their love story. The film is structured around their 2004 concert with the Australian Art Orchestra. So, a lot of the edit was spent boogeying along with the extraordinary music, it was a total joy. The film had its premiere at the Sydney Film Festival 2021, which was a proud moment for me.   


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales? 

Even during my experience in the commercial world I’ve observed a lot of change. Shrinking schedules mean that speed is essential. It’s also becoming commonplace to have a huge suite of edits for social media platforms that accompany larger brand campaigns. Rarely will I cut a 60 second commercial on its own. Rather, it will be alongside a range of 30, 15, and six second versions. Telling a story in six seconds can certainly be a challenge! However, it’s incredible when it works. It’s also a lot of content to manage, but I enjoy the organisation. 


What are your editing ambitions? 

Being able to shift gears between long form projects and commercial work has been incredibly stimulating. I hope to continue that balance. There’s a big world of stories out there and I want to dip my toe into almost everything. A real dream would be to one day edit feature drama. 




Lily’s showreel can be found here.



Kadie Migliarese

Other NYC



What do you love about editing?

I love the subjective nature of editing. Editors are problem solvers, putting this puzzle together, but there is no right or wrong way to go about it. Put the same footage in front of two different editors and you can tell two different stories. 


What project are you proudest of and why?

Last year’s work for CoolSculpting Elite. It was a fun, energetic campaign that I got to see through from TVC to social. 


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

Editors are being asked to take on more roles… creative, writer, designer - and I appreciate the trust clients have in me to be that person for them. Even though in a way we have always been that. I think the new formats are exciting, they allow me to take a spot to a new place and do things that might not fly in the hero version of my cut. You have to approach them as fun creative challenges instead of ‘problems’. 


What are your editing ambitions?

I want to keep on amplifying my client base, editing more diverse jobs of all lengths and formats. There isn’t a challenge that I won’t take on!



Beau Dickson

Cut+Run



What do you love about editing?

How it constantly changes and shapes my life, it’s always an exploration - it requires me to question how I see the world and how I approach each story.  It’s an intimate process, spending time with these captured moments and discovering all their nuances, finding what resonates with me and (hopefully) others.  When I finally discover what feels like the ‘right way’ to tell the story it’s an incredible feeling.  Assembling that first pass is a mixture of accomplishment for solving this creative task I’ve been entrusted with and feeling as though my world has become more full because I’ve helped another story to be told.  I’m just grateful I get to be a part of the process - it’s a magical thing.


What project are you proudest of and why?

I’m especially proud of the New York Times Campaign I just completed. These pieces are so poetic to me. The team developed such a beautiful storytelling device that the process really became about finding the perfect pace and rhythm for each piece. It was essential for each piece to express the voice of the individual while also carrying the legacy of truth and storytelling the NYT is known for. Finding ways to elaborate upon the symmetry of a person’s daily life and the headlines of the NYT was a complex and massively fulfilling endeavour. The style of the cuts pushed me to really search for those perfect moments in the footage that would anchor the story unfolding in front of us. I also loved the amount of freedom I was given to sound design the pieces. The graphic storytelling device and the pacing of the edit worked beautifully with an unexpected soundscape. There was something giddying about finding sound bites and SFX that often held double meanings to what we were seeing. And it felt appropriate to add layers of complexity and nuance wherever possible to the portraits of these lives we were showing.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

The role of the Editor really hasn’t changed. It certainly requires you to be a bit more creative in the how of it - if the project is shot and produced with the varying formats, platforms and time scales in mind - then it can be a really fascinating exercise in how the medium affects the way people perceive the stories they are being shown.  I’ve always been interested in exploring new technologies and how they change the way people perceive the same story across multiple platforms.  If those considerations were not able to be made in advance and the cuts that aren’t going to broadcast are more of an afterthought it can be a missed opportunity for telling those stories in the best method possible for the platforms they’re being shown on.  That being said, unplanned constraints can often push us as Editors to come up with creative techniques to tell these stories in exciting and unexpected ways.  Ultimately, we’re still just trying to figure out how to tell stories in the most compelling way possible.


What are your editing ambitions?

Honestly, I just want to keep progressing. To continue learning and improving, working with good people telling great stories. Also, one day I would like to buy a house on a mountain… and edit there.




Steve Kroodsma

Whitehouse Post



What do you love about editing?

Editing is a unique job in that it’s both highly technical and highly creative, and I enjoy both of those aspects equally. I love the process of putting an edit together, trying different things out to see what works and what doesn’t. I love that you rarely end up with a finished spot that looks exactly the way it was scripted. You also get to use so many different skills: music editing, sound design, compositing, in addition to the actual assembly of the story. It’s fun to wear all those hats. I also really enjoy problem-solving, and that’s a big part of editing.


What project are you proudest of and why?

I really enjoyed cutting the Under Armour piece that’s on my reel. The director and I spent months putting it together, trying out different moments, adjusting the pace and trying to get everything flowing perfectly. It’s shot beautifully and there was so much great footage, it was difficult narrowing down what we wanted to use to tell that story. I’m not really a sports guy but somehow I’ve cut a lot of sports pieces, and it’s always so much fun. 


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

As technology has improved, the expectations for how polished an offline edit should look has continued to go up. Gone are the days of just slapping an FPO super on something and leaving it for the Flame artist to deal with. As someone who loves graphics work, this is actually a shift that suits me fine. I also love having the challenge to learn a new skill, and there’s plenty of opportunity for that these days. With the pandemic, editors are having to become more self-reliant than ever before - I’ve done a number of jobs where I’ve handled every task from start to finish, breaking down the dailies, cutting the job, final mix and colour, final graphics and shipping the master out myself. That’s a far cry from what an editor would be tasked with a decade ago, but being a jack-of-all-trades opens you up to way more work.


What are your editing ambitions?

I’ve wanted to be an editor as long as I’ve known that it existed as a career. Now that I’m actually here it feels like I’ve just summited Everest - where else is there to climb? My goal now is to push myself to be as good at this job as I can possibly be: working faster, learning as many skills as my brain can hold, and exposing myself to new types of work wherever I can. I also want to be a good editor to my assistants. I am where I am because of the editors who took the time to mentor me, let me cut things now and then, and answered my questions. It’s important to me to pay that forward.




Steve’s showreel can be found here.


Chris Walker

Marshall Street Editors



What do you love about editing? 

What I love most about editing is the feeling of accomplishment as a narrative comes together. Assembling individual pieces into a cohesive film, with its myriad possibilities, exploring new ideas & retreading old ground – it's a joy to see what final product becomes of the rushes. The creative freedom feels so limitless. 

 

What project are you proudest of and why? 

I think I’m most proud of the film I cut for Vilanova’s Georgie Curran and Adam Vilanova, advertising the immersive theatre experience ‘Arkham Asylum’. This was a VFX heavy-workflow, which I really enjoy - building tension and an air of threat with the edit. I find editorial timings for horror-style pieces are very similar to comedy, that building up of emotion only to rack to the next centrepiece. Similarly, one of my other favourite films was the spoof of Netflix’s ‘Chef’s Table’ I cut for Dave Christie-Miller. Building a comedy narrative from such golden rushes was just endlessly hilarious, and the snappy trailer-esque pace of the edit was really satisfying to piece together. 

 

How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales? 

The editor has always had a huge creative input into the final film but now, with so many new platforms for viewing video content, I think the editor is more important than ever. With so many deliverables over such varied timeframes & formats, it is incredibly important to keep an impeccably organised workflow, as well as having the ability to marry editing speed with intensely thorough work. This is one of the reasons I love & aim to go on set as much as possible & live cut from a camera feed, so that I can immerse myself more fully into the film and get ahead of deadlines. 

 

What are your editing ambitions? 

Editing is my passion – I hope to be able to edit projects & films I truly care about for the entirety of my career. Different films & deliverables require so many different styles of editing – whether that is due purely to the duration of the deliverable or to the tone/content of the film itself. My ambition is to be able to cut films across all platforms, commercials/short-form & long-form, engaging with clients all over the world.



Chris’ showreel can be found here.



Lucy Berry

Final Cut



What do you love about editing? 

The unpredictability of each week. It’s a heady hit of dopamine and adrenaline riding on the back of stress induced insomnia and imposteritus. When I’m in the flow it can be cathartic but also consuming. But what I love most is the emphasis on human connection and finding the pulse of the piece. It’s transformative. Without collaboration it’s a one-sided conversation. 


What project are you proudest of and why? 

I’d have to say Kano’s ‘Trouble’ has been a career highlight so far, with accolades to show for it. It was an enjoyable challenge that really paid off. More recently, ‘Hard Drive Gold’ for alt-J was a big hit. It was an honour to be involved and work with Joe and Darcy for their directorial debut, touching on the crypto boom and an impending nuclear apocalypse. At the time of writing, chillingly this isn’t a far off possibility.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales? 

The biggest change has been the importance of social media. Usually the last thing on our offline to-do list is to ‘prep for socials’. And let me tell you, nothing feels as shameful as a slap on crop over a delicately crafted TVC for the sake of an attention-grabbing second and a tap to mute. It can scream afterthought and waste an opportunity. With greater accessibility, anyone with an app can be an editor. And now the whole process becomes more transparent. The knock on effect being that young audiences who rarely watch TV can see through tired, cliché-riddled marketing strategies. Social media ad-spend is set to exceed TV for the first time this year. Who knows whether traditionalists will take socials more seriously, or whether it’ll serve as a step up for the next generation. Maybe both. Either way it’s a space for brands to relinquish control and engage with those who crave better representation. Bring on the rapid trend turnarounds, rough and ready UGC, artist collaborations, user-friendly simplicity, and amplify many unheard voices. It’s a playground. Go play! Experiment! Share! Crops optional.


What are your editing ambitions? 

I have many interests to explore creatively. But commercials, content, and music videos can only scratch the itch for so long. Ultimately my ambitions are geared towards long form where nuanced narratives can overlap in more permanence.




Chris Hutchings

Homespun



What do you love about editing?

People don't realise how romantic the editing lifestyle is, long hours alone in a dark room, cutting footage, organising, colour coding… 

But seriously, I think editing is magical. I get to work with the industry’s most creative people, and it’s a privilege to be trusted with bringing someone’s art to life. I love that responsibility, and their imagination inspires me to do my best on every job, no matter how insane the idea! Editing can completely change your mood, and I’m incredibly lucky to be able to do it for a living.


What project are you proudest of and why?

One project that I am particularly proud of is the spot I cut for Asda George last year. The whole process was such great fun, and working with a director who I admire as much as Ato Yankey was amazing. His insight and creativity made going back to school actually cool, and the drill track he got commissioned for the ad gave it a unique quality I've not seen before. It is one of those jobs I still smile at each time I watch it back, which is a real rarity.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

Things have changed dramatically over the years. Technology advancements have helped us make leaps forward, and with that, new trends have emerged. Culturally, we’re expecting things faster and faster, and editing is no different. Work is faster paced with shorter deadlines, so we need to be more agile than ever. Couple that with people wanting offlines to look more like onlines, and it can be hard work. However, it’s amazing to build up those skills and I love to see how far I can take an edit.  


What are your editing ambitions?

In the short term, I want to push myself to be working on larger commercials with a strong creative outlet. I'm also interested in exploring long-form projects, something that is only invigorated by the amazing TV shows that are dropping every week. In the longer term, film will always hold a special place in my heart and I hope one day to work on a feature film. The dream is to sit in a cinema and see it play out on the silver screen, just thinking about that makes me excited to see what the future holds!



Chris’ showreel can be found here.



Meg Thorne 

The Quarry



What do you love about editing?

I love piecing all the footage together after a big production to bring the story to life and to be in control of how it impacts the viewer. It’s like a big puzzle and can be such a challenge. If you think about it there’s so many different outcomes and my job is finding the best one.


What project are you proudest of and why?

I worked on a short called “Filter Face”, directed by Will & Carly, raising awareness of ‘Snapchat Dysmorphia’. Doctors have labelled this new mental health disorder whereby young people are becoming so addicted to their filtered selfies that they’re seeking out plastic surgery to become the idealised, filtered version of themselves. It was a wonderfully choreographed piece and working with dance is a real passion of mine so the whole process was really enjoyable for me. It’s my favourite edit I’ve worked on to date and I’d say I’m most proud of. It also got widely recognised, winning awards at the Berlin Commercial Festival and shortlisted for numerous awards, Shots awards, Bokeh Fashion Film awards and Aesthetica to name a few.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

Social media is rapidly changing the advertising industry. Commercials still play a huge part in what we do but there’s more demand for shorter cut downs for social media. It’s rare now that I work on any project and they don’t require a six second cutdown and it’s interesting seeing the shift in demand for 9x16 edits as well. I find a lot of footage that comes to me has now been shot in a way to allow for this, which five-plus years ago was never really thought of. 


What are your editing ambitions?

I’ve worked on a lot of promos and commercials now but one area I’d love to gain more experience in is editing more comedic content. It’s a real skill, timing is everything, I love it and would love to do more of it.



Meg’s showreel can be found here.



Paul Laurent

Soldats



What do you love about editing?

Everything. The fact that it’s both artistic and technical. You bring the project to life by assembling every piece of work of every people involved in the project. And most of all, bring an atmosphere to it.


What project are you proudest of and why?

Tough question, but for me, it’s a web series called ‘91 VICES’ that I had the pleasure to edit and post-produced. It was made by young people that really want to tell stories, coming from nowhere, just like me. There are a lot of imperfections, but now it’s out and it’s made with love. A lot of very talented people worked on it.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

In our day, it’s funny to know that everyone is kind of an editor because we all have in our pocket a camera that can also work as an edit table. All these new platforms like TikTok allow people to express themselves with filmmaking and editing, so I feel like it’s very popular now. Nowadays you can be an editor in a lot of various domains and that’s why it’s one of the best jobs ever. You just have to do what you love.


What are your editing ambitions?

Working on 91 VICES made me realise that I love to work with actors and enlighten their performances and also tell stories - how do you manage to make it advertising, understandable and aesthetic? Lately, I’ve been working on 2D and 3D projects and it’s very interesting to work with different technologies. I’d love to work on cinematics and a trailer for a video game. To me, it’s the best way to tell story, but also aesthetic film, technologies, commercial and cinematic.



André Rodrigues

The Assembly Rooms



What do you love about editing?

As a kid, I borrowed my dad’s video camera and made a very silly short film with friends, and editing felt like my happy place and it’s what I’ve enjoyed doing ever since. I get to be a bit geeky with all the technical side, and also artistic with the creative side. When it all comes together, it’s like magic.


What project are you proudest of and why?

I worked on a short film, ‘Bingo Queens’ directed by Nick Finnegan, which is about two queer people meeting on a train platform in London and creating an unexpected bond after that encounter. As a queer person myself, I feel so proud to have helped shape this story for the big screen and it’s great to see that story being shown at renowned festivals like LSSF and BFI Flare. I’ve also edited a great piece about Little Simz with Lainey Richardson for Adobe. We managed to make a beautiful film about family, love and creativity on a really tight schedule. Plus Little Simz is such a cool artist so getting to use one of her songs for the edit was the cherry on top.


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

I feel like lines are blurring and editors are pigeonholed less so we get to work on lots of different types of projects. And with remote work, I feel that I have more opportunities for projects that aren’t exclusively London-based. I speak French and Portuguese, and recently I got the opportunity to work on an ad for Google Pixel France and a branded doc for Strava, about a Brazilian female cyclist group. However, it does feel like time scales are getting shorter and I always wish I had more time to experiment and try things out in the edit suite. Time seems to be a luxury nowadays!


What are your editing ambitions?

Editing a feature film would be amazing - I’ve edited a few short films but I’d love the opportunity to work on a longer-form piece. I’m also really interested in TV, especially comedy and comedy-drama - there is some amazing storytelling on TV at the moment. And I love Will Sharpe’s work so working on any of his projects would be a dream.




André’s showreel can be found here.



Rain Keene

Work Editorial (New Wave)



What do you love about editing?

I’m a fairly indecisive person who wants to weigh every possible option before settling on a choice. While that’s probably a bit of a headache for everyone else when I’m ordering lunch — it’s a trait I enjoy bringing into the edit room, where meticulously exploring every possible path with an edit always makes, in my experience, for a stronger film. I love how the smallest possible details can make all the difference in an edit. There’s a real sense of accomplishment in knowing you’ve been through a collaborative process with the director, sifting through all of the decisions that were made before the footage reached me, and collaging them together to make the vision cohere and come to life.


 What project are you proudest of and why? 

Probably Just For Me by PinkPantheress. Working with Lauzza was a lot of fun and the whole project was a great stepping stone to get me to where I am now. At the time, it meant a lot to be trusted with a big project and gave me a lot more confidence as an editor. I love the opportunity to try something new and step outside my comfort zone with a project, and Just For Me offered just that as it was a technical edit with lots of VFX bits. We ended up with a film we were all really proud of, and seeing her go on to win BBC Radio 1’s Sound of 2022 was the icing on the cake. 


How is the role of the editor changing? What is it like editing for new formats, platforms and time scales?

The industry feels like it’s becoming less siloed, and the more nimble and flexible you can be, the better. So many people are coming into filmmaking from different backgrounds now and you never know where your next collaborator might come from, which I find incredibly exciting. I think filmmaking can be a great watering hole for artists and creators from many different mediums and disciplines.  So I think it’s smart to source your inspiration from a wide range of places, to be in tune with what’s going on in film but also in podcasts, gaming, installations, music and fashion. I think being able to think on your feet and adapt quickly are really important traits for editors, especially today.


What are your editing ambitions? 

I feel very grateful that, so far, my career has presented me with the opportunity to work on many different kinds of projects. I truly never have the chance to get bored because with every new project I’ve had the chance to try something unfamiliar and learn a new skill. So if things keep going in this direction, I’ll be happy. Beyond that, I hope I can always remember that we’re very lucky to do what we do. At the end of the day, it’s such a fun job. 


Rain’s showreel can be found here.



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LBB Editorial, Thu, 17 Mar 2022 18:37:00 GMT